This study introduces science communication activities for the public which use the method of “blending science”. This is a way of combining science with non-scientific activities, such as cooking, the Greek Myths, animation, to attract people being less interested in science. Being interested in these areas of non-science, they are expected to also concern with scientific activities and to acquire some scientific knowledge automatically.
The importance of science communication had been widely recognized in Japan since the 2000s and the number of science communication activities increased. However,we have not succeeded to involve the people widely from the general public yet.Science communication in Japan has still been limited within people having high awareness and literacy of science.
However, there are people who are unknowingly interested in science. If the approaches of science communication to these kinds of people are successful, public awareness and literacy of science can be improved.
Thus, we propose the method of “blending science”, i.e., a combination of science and non-science aimed at designing science communication activities for people who are not generally interested in science. Although natural science is an independent discipline, it is also applied to other fields such as mythology and cultures. Therefore, it is possible to design activities by combining science and non-science. These approaches of “blending science” with other cultures or fields are effective to attract people who are not considerably interested in science.
Here, we introduce an example of “Science in Home Life”, which is a weekly article combining cooking or cleaning and science in a newspaper; The Tokyo Shimbun. These articles have not appeared on the scientific page, but on the lifestyle page. 
From the analysis of responses on the Internet, it is recognized that people are likely to follow immediately to the useful contents in daily life. However, usefulness is not the only characteristic of science. If only this characteristic is emphasized, people will misunderstand science as a tool for judging usefulness of things. Therefore, it is necessary to communicate about other characteristics such as scientific processes and the way of thinking about science. We will accordingly discuss about more effective models of science communication activities for the general public.
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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Attracting people’s attention by “blending science”
Case studies of science in home life

Marika Uchida   University of Tokyo

Osamu Sakura   University of Tokyo

This study introduces science communication activities for the public which use the method of “blending science”. This is a way of combining science with non-scientific activities, such as cooking, the Greek Myths, animation, to attract people being less interested in science. Being interested in these areas of non-science, they are expected to also concern with scientific activities and to acquire some scientific knowledge automatically.
The importance of science communication had been widely recognized in Japan since the 2000s and the number of science communication activities increased. However,we have not succeeded to involve the people widely from the general public yet.Science communication in Japan has still been limited within people having high awareness and literacy of science.
However, there are people who are unknowingly interested in science. If the approaches of science communication to these kinds of people are successful, public awareness and literacy of science can be improved.
Thus, we propose the method of “blending science”, i.e., a combination of science and non-science aimed at designing science communication activities for people who are not generally interested in science. Although natural science is an independent discipline, it is also applied to other fields such as mythology and cultures. Therefore, it is possible to design activities by combining science and non-science. These approaches of “blending science” with other cultures or fields are effective to attract people who are not considerably interested in science.
Here, we introduce an example of “Science in Home Life”, which is a weekly article combining cooking or cleaning and science in a newspaper; The Tokyo Shimbun. These articles have not appeared on the scientific page, but on the lifestyle page. 
From the analysis of responses on the Internet, it is recognized that people are likely to follow immediately to the useful contents in daily life. However, usefulness is not the only characteristic of science. If only this characteristic is emphasized, people will misunderstand science as a tool for judging usefulness of things. Therefore, it is necessary to communicate about other characteristics such as scientific processes and the way of thinking about science. We will accordingly discuss about more effective models of science communication activities for the general public.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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