Much of our habits, values and customs come from our social relations, and they influence on ourperception about a certain subject or object. This is explained by Vygotsky‘s sociocultural theory, which we used as a theoretical basis for our research. In the works of Vygotsky, it is also possible to verify the influence of culture on perception and cognitive development of people. We seek, in this abstract, verify some cultural aspects present in the opinion of Brazilian high school students. Here, part of a larger research will be presented. In this presentation, we will focus on questions about habits and attitudes of students towards reading of information available in their daily lives, such as package insert, food packaging information, equipment manuals, etc. The data collection occurred in the years of 2010 and 2011 and it was held in a capital and in the countryside of the five Brazilian regions. Our interview took place by means of a questionnaire (quantitative) and focus groups (qualitative). In this abstract, we present a question of the questionnaire, but a larger analysis, covering both steps (quantitative and qualitative) and the results of each region, will be presented later in the complete paper. In question 18, students were asked about their behavior in relation to the information available in their day-to-day. The following questions were presented: Do you read package inserts?; Do you read information on food packaging?; Do you check technical specifications/manuals?; Do you follow medical advice when making treatment/diet?; Do you keep yourself informed during an epidemic?. The response options were: Yes, often; Yes, sometimes; and No, never. By conducting an analysis of all students’ responses (national sample) we can highlight that most of the students answered “Yes, sometimes” or “No, never” to all previous questions, except for the question: “Do you keep yourself informed during an epidemic?” which showed a large percentage of “Yes, often”. One of the important points, which may have contributed to such result, is the fact that when some epidemic takes place, the media constantly brings news about the subject, and once the television and the internet are the major means of information used by young people, it goes without saying that the percentage of students who are frequently aware of this sort of subject is high (involuntary information).

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Attitudes and habits of high school Brazilian students in relation to everyday information

Raquel Roberta Bertoldo   Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Brazil

Marcia Borin da Cunha   Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Brazil

Olga Maria Ritter Peres   Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná, Brazil

Angela Camila Pinto Duncke   Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Marcelo Giordan   Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

Much of our habits, values and customs come from our social relations, and they influence on ourperception about a certain subject or object. This is explained by Vygotsky‘s sociocultural theory, which we used as a theoretical basis for our research. In the works of Vygotsky, it is also possible to verify the influence of culture on perception and cognitive development of people. We seek, in this abstract, verify some cultural aspects present in the opinion of Brazilian high school students. Here, part of a larger research will be presented. In this presentation, we will focus on questions about habits and attitudes of students towards reading of information available in their daily lives, such as package insert, food packaging information, equipment manuals, etc. The data collection occurred in the years of 2010 and 2011 and it was held in a capital and in the countryside of the five Brazilian regions. Our interview took place by means of a questionnaire (quantitative) and focus groups (qualitative). In this abstract, we present a question of the questionnaire, but a larger analysis, covering both steps (quantitative and qualitative) and the results of each region, will be presented later in the complete paper. In question 18, students were asked about their behavior in relation to the information available in their day-to-day. The following questions were presented: Do you read package inserts?; Do you read information on food packaging?; Do you check technical specifications/manuals?; Do you follow medical advice when making treatment/diet?; Do you keep yourself informed during an epidemic?. The response options were: Yes, often; Yes, sometimes; and No, never. By conducting an analysis of all students’ responses (national sample) we can highlight that most of the students answered “Yes, sometimes” or “No, never” to all previous questions, except for the question: “Do you keep yourself informed during an epidemic?” which showed a large percentage of “Yes, often”. One of the important points, which may have contributed to such result, is the fact that when some epidemic takes place, the media constantly brings news about the subject, and once the television and the internet are the major means of information used by young people, it goes without saying that the percentage of students who are frequently aware of this sort of subject is high (involuntary information).

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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