The role of music as an instrument for artistic expression of a culture and a society is undisputable. Since science and technology are being rapidly assimilated into the representation of modern societies, its appropriation through musical experience would only be natural. Brazilian music is widely recognized by its richness in terms of sounds and rhythms as well as for the lyrics that bring about fine poetry, although meaningless union of words can also be found. In this work, we analyze some characteristics of a radio show entitled “Rhythms of Science” (Ritmos da Ciência, in Portuguese), which explores Brazilian popular music (MPB) as the inspiration for texts on science and technology. Since 2009 “Rhythms of Science” is broadcast through a university radio station - UFMG Educativa FM, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It is also available on the internet (www.ufmg.br/ naondadavida). About five minutes-long, the program briefly evokes a specific song, relating the lyrics or part of it with a scientific subject. The relationship is sometimes evident but eventually the words are just a start point for bringing about curious facts about a theme. Producers are aware that a text of only 1,200 characters will not be enough to explain the complexity of some scientific topics. Nonetheless, this may trigger the curiosity and interest for science in a public that would not usually listen to conventional science shows, especially because there is a link with a cultural or artistic fact. We will explain the steps involved in the production process, including how inspiration is invited into the scene, and how this is intimately connected to the different profiles of producers (mostly undergraduate students from biological sciences or humanities). A preliminary analysis showed that the most frequent themes are zoology, botany and ecology but also included physiology, genetics, physics and astronomy. The link with culture, informality and informative content of the programs are suitable for their use in elementary and high school, the reason why they have been included in educational material for teachers to be used in Sciences and Biology classes.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Brazilian pop music as an inspiration for a radio show on science and technology

Enise Castro Silva   Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil

Tatiane Resende   Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil

Bárbara Ávila Maia   Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil

Adlane Vilas-Boas Ferreira   Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil

The role of music as an instrument for artistic expression of a culture and a society is undisputable. Since science and technology are being rapidly assimilated into the representation of modern societies, its appropriation through musical experience would only be natural. Brazilian music is widely recognized by its richness in terms of sounds and rhythms as well as for the lyrics that bring about fine poetry, although meaningless union of words can also be found. In this work, we analyze some characteristics of a radio show entitled “Rhythms of Science” (Ritmos da Ciência, in Portuguese), which explores Brazilian popular music (MPB) as the inspiration for texts on science and technology. Since 2009 “Rhythms of Science” is broadcast through a university radio station - UFMG Educativa FM, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It is also available on the internet (www.ufmg.br/ naondadavida). About five minutes-long, the program briefly evokes a specific song, relating the lyrics or part of it with a scientific subject. The relationship is sometimes evident but eventually the words are just a start point for bringing about curious facts about a theme. Producers are aware that a text of only 1,200 characters will not be enough to explain the complexity of some scientific topics. Nonetheless, this may trigger the curiosity and interest for science in a public that would not usually listen to conventional science shows, especially because there is a link with a cultural or artistic fact. We will explain the steps involved in the production process, including how inspiration is invited into the scene, and how this is intimately connected to the different profiles of producers (mostly undergraduate students from biological sciences or humanities). A preliminary analysis showed that the most frequent themes are zoology, botany and ecology but also included physiology, genetics, physics and astronomy. The link with culture, informality and informative content of the programs are suitable for their use in elementary and high school, the reason why they have been included in educational material for teachers to be used in Sciences and Biology classes.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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