We consider that museum curators are one of the scientists who should have the science communication skill which leads to some sort of social inclusion. This presentation introduces an online database system which can help science communication between museum curators and the public. It is called “Science Literacy Passport β” and is part of our ongoing research project which started in 2012 at National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo (NMNS). There are two purposes of the above-mentioned research. One is to establish the museum utilization model in which science literacy is fostered in the knowledge circulating society. Another one is to establish an interactive lifelong learning system as a new museum function. “Science Literacy Passport β” system was launched in July 2013 with 17 partner institutions including NMNS (as of August 2013). The alliance is composed of Japanese domestic museums in five areas and a science center abroad to achieve science communication nationally and internationally. Briefly speaking, museum curators input the data of their educational programs into the database using a common framework which was proposed in the conference of PCST 2010 (Ogawa et al., 2010). The data is shared between not only museum curators but also the museum users who have a special card called PCALi. PCALi is short for Passport of Communication and Action for Literacy. This card is scanned when taking part in the program at museums and the personal learning history is recorded on the system. In addition to that, surveys of each program are held online and museum curators can receive feedbacks from the participants to run better programs or to develop new ones. This helps the curators to learn from each other. Finally, museum users themselves can share their thoughts between each other by leaving comments on each program’s page. Overall there are three ways of communication: 1) between museum users themselves; 2) between museum curators themselves; and 3) between museum users and curators. This system will be carried until the beginning of 2016. To enrich the database, we are trying to collect and develop programs related to the local community’s current affairs. Fukushima, which is in one of the five areas of our alliance, has museums that run outreach programs about radiation. Examples like this will be explained together with the system itself.

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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Development of the online database system as a function of science communication between museum curators and museum users

Yoshikazu Ogawa   National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan

Motoko Shonaka   National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan

Mika Matsuo   National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan

Tsutomu Okada   National Museum of Nature and Science, Japan

We consider that museum curators are one of the scientists who should have the science communication skill which leads to some sort of social inclusion. This presentation introduces an online database system which can help science communication between museum curators and the public. It is called “Science Literacy Passport β” and is part of our ongoing research project which started in 2012 at National Museum of Nature and Science, Tokyo (NMNS). There are two purposes of the above-mentioned research. One is to establish the museum utilization model in which science literacy is fostered in the knowledge circulating society. Another one is to establish an interactive lifelong learning system as a new museum function. “Science Literacy Passport β” system was launched in July 2013 with 17 partner institutions including NMNS (as of August 2013). The alliance is composed of Japanese domestic museums in five areas and a science center abroad to achieve science communication nationally and internationally. Briefly speaking, museum curators input the data of their educational programs into the database using a common framework which was proposed in the conference of PCST 2010 (Ogawa et al., 2010). The data is shared between not only museum curators but also the museum users who have a special card called PCALi. PCALi is short for Passport of Communication and Action for Literacy. This card is scanned when taking part in the program at museums and the personal learning history is recorded on the system. In addition to that, surveys of each program are held online and museum curators can receive feedbacks from the participants to run better programs or to develop new ones. This helps the curators to learn from each other. Finally, museum users themselves can share their thoughts between each other by leaving comments on each program’s page. Overall there are three ways of communication: 1) between museum users themselves; 2) between museum curators themselves; and 3) between museum users and curators. This system will be carried until the beginning of 2016. To enrich the database, we are trying to collect and develop programs related to the local community’s current affairs. Fukushima, which is in one of the five areas of our alliance, has museums that run outreach programs about radiation. Examples like this will be explained together with the system itself.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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