The paper presents a comparative analysis of diverse perspectives of science communication patterns emerging from the experiences gained through “IndiaBrazil Knowledge Network”, that offers a dialogue on public communication of science, technology, culture and society in two countries. The paper explores a common ground from different fields to evolve science communication truly as an interdisciplinary area with equal participation and contribution of scientists and specialists from different sectors, i.e, scientific, technological, communication, cultural, and social. The lessons learnt from the dialogue form part of present study that suggests a steady progress to bring together common platforms of interactions and expressions. The first in the series “Sharing Science” is a monumental document of valuable contributions from scholars of India and Brazil. A yet another voyage of “Sharing Science: Science and Art Dialogue” is in the making that covers a wide range of contributions of scholars from two countries combining sciences and arts. The plurality and commonality of their needs, concerns and challenges offer opportunities for both the giants to joining hands and synergizing efforts in the area of science communication. A combination of creativity driven science and media has been able to lay down foundations of rich initiatives. If scientific literacy implies disseminating knowledge of science, its wonders, scope, application, etc., then perhaps in Indian and Brazilian context ‘scientific and technological temper’ has more meaning and relevance. What we should be looking for that our populations at large should develop a scientific outlook rather than being told about facets of science alone that allows informed and logical application of science and elimination of superstitions and ignorance. The study reveals that an organic approach has taken shape and making inroads. India and Brazil are poised with many challenges that offer opportunities and possibilities. A comparative study suggests that Brazil generally follows a western model of public communication involving “the science museums, planetariums, exhibitions, lectures, audio-video media and high-end technological application” approach, whereas India focuses on “folk forms, Vigyan Jatha, print and visual media, road-shows, and people’s involvement” approach. The study may help “India-Brazil Knowledge Network” dialogue to workout commonalities in current approaches and evolve a common approach.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Diverse perspectives of science communication in india and brazil
A case study

Manoj Kumar Patairiya   National Council For Science & Technology Communication, India

Maria Inês Nogueira   University of Sao Paulo, Brazil

The paper presents a comparative analysis of diverse perspectives of science communication patterns emerging from the experiences gained through “IndiaBrazil Knowledge Network”, that offers a dialogue on public communication of science, technology, culture and society in two countries. The paper explores a common ground from different fields to evolve science communication truly as an interdisciplinary area with equal participation and contribution of scientists and specialists from different sectors, i.e, scientific, technological, communication, cultural, and social. The lessons learnt from the dialogue form part of present study that suggests a steady progress to bring together common platforms of interactions and expressions. The first in the series “Sharing Science” is a monumental document of valuable contributions from scholars of India and Brazil. A yet another voyage of “Sharing Science: Science and Art Dialogue” is in the making that covers a wide range of contributions of scholars from two countries combining sciences and arts. The plurality and commonality of their needs, concerns and challenges offer opportunities for both the giants to joining hands and synergizing efforts in the area of science communication. A combination of creativity driven science and media has been able to lay down foundations of rich initiatives. If scientific literacy implies disseminating knowledge of science, its wonders, scope, application, etc., then perhaps in Indian and Brazilian context ‘scientific and technological temper’ has more meaning and relevance. What we should be looking for that our populations at large should develop a scientific outlook rather than being told about facets of science alone that allows informed and logical application of science and elimination of superstitions and ignorance. The study reveals that an organic approach has taken shape and making inroads. India and Brazil are poised with many challenges that offer opportunities and possibilities. A comparative study suggests that Brazil generally follows a western model of public communication involving “the science museums, planetariums, exhibitions, lectures, audio-video media and high-end technological application” approach, whereas India focuses on “folk forms, Vigyan Jatha, print and visual media, road-shows, and people’s involvement” approach. The study may help “India-Brazil Knowledge Network” dialogue to workout commonalities in current approaches and evolve a common approach.

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