Comics are a communication media that present their own language and characteristics, such as talk text in balloons and cartoons in frames that is frequently used nowadays to entertain. Eisner defines comics as sequential art, once the picture frames are in sequence. Among this thematic, manga, the Japanese comics, are characterized by characters with big and over expressed eyes, appraising cinematographic movements in the storyline rhythm. Comics could be also a powerful way to communicate science, once the union of text and image produces an amusing combination that involves the target public, nevertheless this possibility is ignored by researchers that do not believe in diffusing or teaching science at this different way (Tatalovic, 2009). In addition, sometimes the image of crazy scientist or science as a difficult subject back off the public or attract them by the wrong purposes, resulting in a few comics about science. (e.g. Sciencetoons (Srivastava, P.); Newton and Copernicus (Olson, J.C.)). There are some didactic books presenting Physics and Calculus with manga characters and according to Vergueiro is possible to join the entertainment of cartoons in a teaching-learning complementary activity to formal education. Another aspect to be considered is the science literacy related to the process of creating and diffusing scientific manga, once the knowledge and values developed take to more conscious citizen worried about the world‘s future. The students formed by this way considering the link between art and science in a non-formal education system develop better skills and become more critics about both subjects. Based on these arguments Sigma Pi project intends to teach how do use manga language to communicate science and practice science literacy, especially with Chemistry subjects. Some drawing techniques will be discussed at the same time that visual demonstrations of chemical reaction will be performed to the public, constructing together a manga story in real time. TATALOVIC, M. Science comics as tools for science education and communication: a brief, exploratory study. J. Sci. Communication, Italy, n. 4, 2009. p. 4-6. VERGUEIRO, W. Como usar as histórias em quadrinhos na sala de aula. São Paulo: Contexto, 2009. CARUSO, F. Desafios da alfabetização científica. Ciência & Sociedade, Rio de Janeiro, n.10, 2003. p. 1-2. EISNER, W. Comics and sequencial art. Luís Carlos Borges (Trad.). 3 ed. São Paulo: Martins Fontes, 2001.

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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Sigma pi
Comics and science communication

Adriana Iwata   Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil

Karina Omuro Lupetti   Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil

Comics are a communication media that present their own language and characteristics, such as talk text in balloons and cartoons in frames that is frequently used nowadays to entertain. Eisner defines comics as sequential art, once the picture frames are in sequence. Among this thematic, manga, the Japanese comics, are characterized by characters with big and over expressed eyes, appraising cinematographic movements in the storyline rhythm. Comics could be also a powerful way to communicate science, once the union of text and image produces an amusing combination that involves the target public, nevertheless this possibility is ignored by researchers that do not believe in diffusing or teaching science at this different way (Tatalovic, 2009). In addition, sometimes the image of crazy scientist or science as a difficult subject back off the public or attract them by the wrong purposes, resulting in a few comics about science. (e.g. Sciencetoons (Srivastava, P.); Newton and Copernicus (Olson, J.C.)). There are some didactic books presenting Physics and Calculus with manga characters and according to Vergueiro is possible to join the entertainment of cartoons in a teaching-learning complementary activity to formal education. Another aspect to be considered is the science literacy related to the process of creating and diffusing scientific manga, once the knowledge and values developed take to more conscious citizen worried about the world‘s future. The students formed by this way considering the link between art and science in a non-formal education system develop better skills and become more critics about both subjects. Based on these arguments Sigma Pi project intends to teach how do use manga language to communicate science and practice science literacy, especially with Chemistry subjects. Some drawing techniques will be discussed at the same time that visual demonstrations of chemical reaction will be performed to the public, constructing together a manga story in real time. TATALOVIC, M. Science comics as tools for science education and communication: a brief, exploratory study. J. Sci. Communication, Italy, n. 4, 2009. p. 4-6. VERGUEIRO, W. Como usar as histórias em quadrinhos na sala de aula. São Paulo: Contexto, 2009. CARUSO, F. Desafios da alfabetização científica. Ciência & Sociedade, Rio de Janeiro, n.10, 2003. p. 1-2. EISNER, W. Comics and sequencial art. Luís Carlos Borges (Trad.). 3 ed. São Paulo: Martins Fontes, 2001.

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