The Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies partners with the South African Department of Health (DoH) in an HIV Treatment and Care Programme in a rural region of high HIV prevalence of South Africa. This is a large, devolved, primary health care programme with more than 21,000 people on antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, drug adherence is poorly understood in the local community and between 10 to 20% of patients fail ART within 2 years of initiation (Bärnighausen et al. 2011; Mutevedzi P et al. 2010 and Manasa et al. 2012). If we want to prevent drug resistance, and improve the health of this community, it is important that this scientific knowledge is shared. This led to the idea of harnessing the novel, participatory visual methodology of digital storytelling to create short, first person video-narratives about ART adherence in this community. We will employ these stories to provide insight into the voices and views of this indigenous, rural population, to increase public understanding of adherence and drug resistance and to stimulate dialogue about this area of biomedical research. In summary, in the Adherence Stories project we aim to: 1. Empower patients and health care workers to share their ART experiences through a series of digital storytelling (short, first person video narratives) workshops. 2. Create a short film that features a selection of digital stories and a narrative informed by Africa Centre research on HIV drug resistance and adherence. 3. Engage the public in a variety of community settings using this DVD to provide information and encourage dialogue about what is involved in taking drugs, about potential challenges for the individual about and how a community can help people on treatment. 4. Evaluate the impact of this project through a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. We are very excited about this novel and inclusive model to facilitate scientific communication and to boost community participation in the creation and diffusion of scientific knowledge in this rural and impoverished setting. In the proposed presentation, a selection of these stories will be screened, followed by a discussion concerning the process and outcomes of this public engagement initiative.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Adherence stories
Public engagement with hiv drug adherence through audiovisual media

Astrid Treffry-Goatley   Africa Centre, University of KwaZulu Natal, South Africa

The Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies partners with the South African Department of Health (DoH) in an HIV Treatment and Care Programme in a rural region of high HIV prevalence of South Africa. This is a large, devolved, primary health care programme with more than 21,000 people on antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, drug adherence is poorly understood in the local community and between 10 to 20% of patients fail ART within 2 years of initiation (Bärnighausen et al. 2011; Mutevedzi P et al. 2010 and Manasa et al. 2012). If we want to prevent drug resistance, and improve the health of this community, it is important that this scientific knowledge is shared. This led to the idea of harnessing the novel, participatory visual methodology of digital storytelling to create short, first person video-narratives about ART adherence in this community. We will employ these stories to provide insight into the voices and views of this indigenous, rural population, to increase public understanding of adherence and drug resistance and to stimulate dialogue about this area of biomedical research. In summary, in the Adherence Stories project we aim to: 1. Empower patients and health care workers to share their ART experiences through a series of digital storytelling (short, first person video narratives) workshops. 2. Create a short film that features a selection of digital stories and a narrative informed by Africa Centre research on HIV drug resistance and adherence. 3. Engage the public in a variety of community settings using this DVD to provide information and encourage dialogue about what is involved in taking drugs, about potential challenges for the individual about and how a community can help people on treatment. 4. Evaluate the impact of this project through a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. We are very excited about this novel and inclusive model to facilitate scientific communication and to boost community participation in the creation and diffusion of scientific knowledge in this rural and impoverished setting. In the proposed presentation, a selection of these stories will be screened, followed by a discussion concerning the process and outcomes of this public engagement initiative.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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