In 2011, International Year of Chemistry (IYC), several activities were taken over in favor of research and education in chemistry. In Brazil, many organizations representing the Chemical society were responsible for promoting lectures, developing educational materials, coordinating exhibitions, among other nationwide actions. Such activities were widely publicized by press as well by other institutional sources or even by individual initiatives. In this context, this paper analyzes records of such dissemination in Brazil, from small notes about the occurrence of coming up events to special articles with focus on chemistry. It was found that the main sources of publication about IYC were press vehicles and academic institutions, while the two most widespread types of activities were lectures and exhibitions. An appreciable part of the records on the IYC contextualizes the date and mentions the importance of chemistry, but considerations regarding these topics decrease throughout the year. Furthermore, it was noticed that dissemination work reflects the seasonality of the activities promoted. The analysis also reveals that lectures are the most reported activities by academic institutions, which moreover, they are the sources that more cite researchers. References to chemistry as professional area are more frequent in contents published by professional organizations, but they are very rare in cases of individual initiatives. Finally, the visibility of activities may be associated with sources of dissemination, which present different degrees of diffusion in society. Such results seem to suggest that popularization of the IYC exhibited distinct profiles according to the source of dissemination and the public whom it was intended to, since it was possible to identify differences in how academics, members of industry, professional organizations and individuals publicize chemistry. Although these features make sense, it is plausible to question how far the disclosure of chemistry, as it has been observed, may contribute to the purpose of disseminating, to the widest possible audience, the importance of chemistry as a knowledge area and professional field. Besides, it is evident that the success of the dissemination work demands on the articulation among the various sectors of chemistry (including academy, industry and government), the press and the government, in order to promote and support activities that disseminate the real identity of chemistry.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

The impact of broad actions to disseminate science
A case study from the international year of chemistry

Leila Cardoso Teruya   Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

Guilherme Andrade Marson   Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

In 2011, International Year of Chemistry (IYC), several activities were taken over in favor of research and education in chemistry. In Brazil, many organizations representing the Chemical society were responsible for promoting lectures, developing educational materials, coordinating exhibitions, among other nationwide actions. Such activities were widely publicized by press as well by other institutional sources or even by individual initiatives. In this context, this paper analyzes records of such dissemination in Brazil, from small notes about the occurrence of coming up events to special articles with focus on chemistry. It was found that the main sources of publication about IYC were press vehicles and academic institutions, while the two most widespread types of activities were lectures and exhibitions. An appreciable part of the records on the IYC contextualizes the date and mentions the importance of chemistry, but considerations regarding these topics decrease throughout the year. Furthermore, it was noticed that dissemination work reflects the seasonality of the activities promoted. The analysis also reveals that lectures are the most reported activities by academic institutions, which moreover, they are the sources that more cite researchers. References to chemistry as professional area are more frequent in contents published by professional organizations, but they are very rare in cases of individual initiatives. Finally, the visibility of activities may be associated with sources of dissemination, which present different degrees of diffusion in society. Such results seem to suggest that popularization of the IYC exhibited distinct profiles according to the source of dissemination and the public whom it was intended to, since it was possible to identify differences in how academics, members of industry, professional organizations and individuals publicize chemistry. Although these features make sense, it is plausible to question how far the disclosure of chemistry, as it has been observed, may contribute to the purpose of disseminating, to the widest possible audience, the importance of chemistry as a knowledge area and professional field. Besides, it is evident that the success of the dissemination work demands on the articulation among the various sectors of chemistry (including academy, industry and government), the press and the government, in order to promote and support activities that disseminate the real identity of chemistry.

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