In the closing ceremony of PCST 2012 held in Italy, the presidential address called the attention to the paper we had presented at that event (Santos-Gouw et al 2012), in which the popularity of science and scientists showed a clear tendency. In the context of the Relevance of Science Education Project (ROSE) (Sjøberg & Schreiner, 2010), highschool students of rich countries tended to disagree with some statements about science and technology, while students from less developed countries tended to show an opposite tendency. They tended to have a more optimistic view of the role of scientists in society. An extensive item analysis was carried out in order to select itens with a higher statistical discrimination power, so that further research could be carried out in the future, allowing further comparisons, creating a shorther instrument. Meanwhile, a new analysis was carreid out, trying to understand reasons which could explain such results, which defined a paradox: the more a society is developed thanks to science and technology (amongst other things), the less its citizen tend to value science and technology. This new analysis carried out with in depth consideration of the Brazilian results (Tolentino-Neto 2008; Bizzo e Pellegrini, 2013) tends to show that results are less dramatic than what first sight could indicate, as the paradox stated above do not have a linear correlation between presented variables and proved not to be true in the Brazilian context. In addition, there are indications that the relevant variable for the correlation is not GNP or compound indexes, such as GINI, HDI etc, but rather some indication of the real educational services provided to the population. Therfore, the paradox could possibly be rephrased as follow: the more quality science education is provided the more informed and critical students are.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

The rich do not like science?
A new insight of the global results of rose project and a new proposal to bring to light students attitudes towards science and technology

Nelio Bizzo   University of São Paulo, Brazil

Ana Maria Santos Gouw   University of São Paulo, Brazil

Graciela Oliveira   University of São Paulo, Brazil

Jaqueline Pinaffo   University of São Paulo, Brazil

In the closing ceremony of PCST 2012 held in Italy, the presidential address called the attention to the paper we had presented at that event (Santos-Gouw et al 2012), in which the popularity of science and scientists showed a clear tendency. In the context of the Relevance of Science Education Project (ROSE) (Sjøberg & Schreiner, 2010), highschool students of rich countries tended to disagree with some statements about science and technology, while students from less developed countries tended to show an opposite tendency. They tended to have a more optimistic view of the role of scientists in society. An extensive item analysis was carried out in order to select itens with a higher statistical discrimination power, so that further research could be carried out in the future, allowing further comparisons, creating a shorther instrument. Meanwhile, a new analysis was carreid out, trying to understand reasons which could explain such results, which defined a paradox: the more a society is developed thanks to science and technology (amongst other things), the less its citizen tend to value science and technology. This new analysis carried out with in depth consideration of the Brazilian results (Tolentino-Neto 2008; Bizzo e Pellegrini, 2013) tends to show that results are less dramatic than what first sight could indicate, as the paradox stated above do not have a linear correlation between presented variables and proved not to be true in the Brazilian context. In addition, there are indications that the relevant variable for the correlation is not GNP or compound indexes, such as GINI, HDI etc, but rather some indication of the real educational services provided to the population. Therfore, the paradox could possibly be rephrased as follow: the more quality science education is provided the more informed and critical students are.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP