African Science Heroes, a poster, film, and biographical narrative on the triumphs of African scientists, serves two primary purposes: to empower budding young African scientists by describing innovative possibilities that can be achieved in any walk of life and to document the legacies of African scientists. This presentation will describe the development of the book, film, and posters for African Science Heroes and the engagement and response from African students. African Science Heroes was the product of a fellowship at the Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge, on the Public Understanding of Science in Africa.

The lack of recognized, publicized African science role models negatively impacts on the ambitions of young Africans and has serious implications for their self esteem. This project celebrates and demonstrates what can be achieved regardless of economic hardship, war, gender discrimination, and racism. It has ensured a space in history where nothing currently exists that pulls together tales of remarkable African scientific accomplishments. It challenges the stereotypical image of Africa as a continent of hunger, disease, war and poverty. These stories of success have motivated young scholars by providing pioneering science role models. The films and posters have been shared with audiences in the Malawi, Kenya, and the UK.

The collection celebrates the remarkable achievement of 15 African scientists (11 men and 4 women). The scientists featured are from varying disciplines - from nuclear physics and nanotechnology to immunology and computer engineering. They all originate from Sub Saharan Africa with a majority of them living and working in Africa. They were been identified through peers, awards lists and science periodicals. The common thread in these stories is triumph over adversity.

African Science Heroes stand for triumph over adversity and the personal values of sustained hard work, extraordinary imagination, and unfaltering dedication.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

African science heroes

Mzamose Gondwe   University of Western Australia

African Science Heroes, a poster, film, and biographical narrative on the triumphs of African scientists, serves two primary purposes: to empower budding young African scientists by describing innovative possibilities that can be achieved in any walk of life and to document the legacies of African scientists. This presentation will describe the development of the book, film, and posters for African Science Heroes and the engagement and response from African students. African Science Heroes was the product of a fellowship at the Centre of African Studies, University of Cambridge, on the Public Understanding of Science in Africa.

The lack of recognized, publicized African science role models negatively impacts on the ambitions of young Africans and has serious implications for their self esteem. This project celebrates and demonstrates what can be achieved regardless of economic hardship, war, gender discrimination, and racism. It has ensured a space in history where nothing currently exists that pulls together tales of remarkable African scientific accomplishments. It challenges the stereotypical image of Africa as a continent of hunger, disease, war and poverty. These stories of success have motivated young scholars by providing pioneering science role models. The films and posters have been shared with audiences in the Malawi, Kenya, and the UK.

The collection celebrates the remarkable achievement of 15 African scientists (11 men and 4 women). The scientists featured are from varying disciplines - from nuclear physics and nanotechnology to immunology and computer engineering. They all originate from Sub Saharan Africa with a majority of them living and working in Africa. They were been identified through peers, awards lists and science periodicals. The common thread in these stories is triumph over adversity.

African Science Heroes stand for triumph over adversity and the personal values of sustained hard work, extraordinary imagination, and unfaltering dedication.

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