Effective engagement of science with its publics requires: (1) that publics actively appropriate the resources provided by science for more robust capacity for active citizenship; (2) the engagement of scientists and scientific institutions with publics on a collaborative basis for addressing science and technology-based concerns. Our project aims to create the conditions for scientists to understand the plurality and diversity of publics whom they are expected to engage with, as well as developing the capacities and skills required for a constructive interaction for dealing with publicly relevant issues. We will use Science Shop models, which have been part of the landscape of the public engagement with science in many European countries and beyond and that have been a very important means of democratisation of science. The diversity of experiences in this field provides a very rich repertoire of organisational models, initiatives and modes of articulation of the concerns of scientists and scientific institutions and different kinds of publics. However, the experience of Science shops is unevenly distributed across countries, and Europe is not an exception. Portugal is a conspicuous case of absence of experience with science shops. In this project, the science shop will be thematically oriented towards issues related to the life sciences in society. It is expected to address both issues in biological and biomedical research that are matters of public concern and controversy (through the organisation of debates, deliberative fora, online fora and exchanges, performances and exhibitions), and issues raised by specific publics, such as matters of food safety, animal welfare, public health, health care or reproductive health. The institutions involved in this project are active in the fields of the life and biomedical sciences and of the social sciences, with a standing commitment to the development of science-society relationships, based on transdisciplinary approaches bringing together the life, biomedical and social sciences and the arts. This will be achieved through the creation of an infrastructure for the continuing support of the work ofthe science shop and for communication; the identification and “interessment” of a variety of publics; the training of mediators/facilitators for science shop activities; the development of pilot activities as a “demonstration effect” of the potential of science shops for promoting science- society dialogues and collaborations; and the dissemination and sharing of experiences with a view to encouraging and supporting the development of other Science shops.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Biosense project as a dialogical model

Borlido-Santos J.   Universidade do Porto

Martins S.   Universidade do Porto

Arriscado J.   Universidade de Coimbra

Effective engagement of science with its publics requires: (1) that publics actively appropriate the resources provided by science for more robust capacity for active citizenship; (2) the engagement of scientists and scientific institutions with publics on a collaborative basis for addressing science and technology-based concerns. Our project aims to create the conditions for scientists to understand the plurality and diversity of publics whom they are expected to engage with, as well as developing the capacities and skills required for a constructive interaction for dealing with publicly relevant issues. We will use Science Shop models, which have been part of the landscape of the public engagement with science in many European countries and beyond and that have been a very important means of democratisation of science. The diversity of experiences in this field provides a very rich repertoire of organisational models, initiatives and modes of articulation of the concerns of scientists and scientific institutions and different kinds of publics. However, the experience of Science shops is unevenly distributed across countries, and Europe is not an exception. Portugal is a conspicuous case of absence of experience with science shops. In this project, the science shop will be thematically oriented towards issues related to the life sciences in society. It is expected to address both issues in biological and biomedical research that are matters of public concern and controversy (through the organisation of debates, deliberative fora, online fora and exchanges, performances and exhibitions), and issues raised by specific publics, such as matters of food safety, animal welfare, public health, health care or reproductive health. The institutions involved in this project are active in the fields of the life and biomedical sciences and of the social sciences, with a standing commitment to the development of science-society relationships, based on transdisciplinary approaches bringing together the life, biomedical and social sciences and the arts. This will be achieved through the creation of an infrastructure for the continuing support of the work ofthe science shop and for communication; the identification and “interessment” of a variety of publics; the training of mediators/facilitators for science shop activities; the development of pilot activities as a “demonstration effect” of the potential of science shops for promoting science- society dialogues and collaborations; and the dissemination and sharing of experiences with a view to encouraging and supporting the development of other Science shops.

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