The programme provides input into various discussions: co-creation of science communication products by members of the target audiences; possibilities for integrating evaluation directly into science communication processes; and the power of music to increase agency of young people to create messages which can speak directly into society, and even to politicians and policy makers. (Since the initiative requests have been received for the participants to present their songs at conferences on science engagement and on public health.)

Drawing on the hip hop movement, a "voice of the marginalised", Hip Hop Science Spaza creates songs which are messaging and advocacy tools, empower new audiences into active roles as scientists in society, and involve young people in public communication of science.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Hip Hop Health – Research, Rhythm and Rhyme for Healthy Communities

Robert Inglis  

How can we grow appreciation of the power of scientific research to transform lives among audiences who have little or no lived experience of science culture?

The Hip Hop Science Spaza programme uses local interpretations of Hip Hop and Rap to create an engagement space which includes young people, musicians and scientists. Youth engage with scientists and conduct research projects in order to create and perform songs which are recorded and shared via digital media. The results: a showcase of science communication products; increased sense of agency among youth; and increased skills for science engagement among scientists.

This discussion arises from projects implemented by Science Spaza (a "spaza" is an informal corner shop) during 2015 in South Africa. Science Spaza supports self-initiated science clubs with activity based science and mathematics learning resources. Hip Hop Science Spaza supports learners to participate in creating media for sharing within (and beyond) the Science Spaza network.

The programme provides input into various discussions: co-creation of science communication products by members of the target audiences; possibilities for integrating evaluation directly into science communication processes; and the power of music to increase agency of young people to create messages which can speak directly into society, and even to politicians and policy makers. (Since the initiative requests have been received for the participants to present their songs at conferences on science engagement and on public health.)

Drawing on the hip hop movement, a "voice of the marginalised", Hip Hop Science Spaza creates songs which are messaging and advocacy tools, empower new audiences into active roles as scientists in society, and involve young people in public communication of science.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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