pression for defenders of human and environmental rights. The 2016 paper will allow reflective analysis of the author's experiences returning to live in Australia in a time of changing laws related to technology, environment and human rights. Changes to laws have implications for medical, media and digital activism ethics, as well as norms about what a "reasonable person" does in response to limits on freedom of expression linked to professional ethics. This is relevant to negotiations about safeguards of the rights of local communities in climate governance. Political inaction about ongoing ecological crises, including climate change, threatens the mental health and wellbeing of human rights defenders concerned with the rights of peoples dependent on natural ecosystems. Resilience may depend on interdependence and communication across non-state and intra-state networks. Increasingly nonsensical and satirical methods of communication may be a coping mechanism in response to such breakdowns of trust in traditional state and economic structures. Contextualising this work within the Public Communication of Science and Technology network will allow exploration of how changes in laws, economics and human rights impact science and technology communication. It will draw explicitly on Cobi's work as a consultant with the United Nations Institute for Training and Research in developing citizen science with humanitarian aims, as well as exploring continuing social equity challenges limiting peoples' capacity to exercise their rights to science, education and liveable wages. This paper will draw particularly on the research of Emily Dawson in framing these issues within science communication institutions and practice. ">
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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Rethinking law, economy and environment

Cobi Smith  

This paper and presentation will build upon work developed at the interdisciplinary workshop "rethinking law, economy and environment" (see http://activismandenterprise.weebly.com/law-economy-environment-workshop.html for context). It will build upon Cobi's paper presented at the UNSW workshop about implications of state restrictions on freedom of expression for defenders of human and environmental rights. The 2016 paper will allow reflective analysis of the author's experiences returning to live in Australia in a time of changing laws related to technology, environment and human rights. Changes to laws have implications for medical, media and digital activism ethics, as well as norms about what a "reasonable person" does in response to limits on freedom of expression linked to professional ethics. This is relevant to negotiations about safeguards of the rights of local communities in climate governance. Political inaction about ongoing ecological crises, including climate change, threatens the mental health and wellbeing of human rights defenders concerned with the rights of peoples dependent on natural ecosystems. Resilience may depend on interdependence and communication across non-state and intra-state networks. Increasingly nonsensical and satirical methods of communication may be a coping mechanism in response to such breakdowns of trust in traditional state and economic structures. Contextualising this work within the Public Communication of Science and Technology network will allow exploration of how changes in laws, economics and human rights impact science and technology communication. It will draw explicitly on Cobi's work as a consultant with the United Nations Institute for Training and Research in developing citizen science with humanitarian aims, as well as exploring continuing social equity challenges limiting peoples' capacity to exercise their rights to science, education and liveable wages. This paper will draw particularly on the research of Emily Dawson in framing these issues within science communication institutions and practice.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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