Public Understanding of Science and Technology (PUST) has been addressed and implemented in Japan since 2002 in Biotechnology Strategy Guidelines Japan (BT Japan). The BT Japan has clearly demonstrated to improve public engagement for science literacy in the general public in Japan. In response to White paper, there are various kinds of activities organized by different stakeholders such as governmental organizations (GO), governmental organizations (NGO), academic or research intuitions, and private sectors in Japan. Currently, Taiwan is still lacking of long-term science communication strategies or public engagement on S&T mechanisms. PUST or “science communication” is just at the beginning stages for Taiwanese stakeholders, particularly the governments of Taiwan. They are in the progress to establish S&T policies to improve science communication, including public engagement and understanding of S&T etc.

This paper reviews the current status and addresses the challenges and requirements it faces in implementing science communication strategies in Taiwan and Japan, by analyzing the following issues: (1) science communication strategies under the framework of biotechnology policies, from the policy to practice; (2) summaries the current public engagement activities by different stakeholders, particularly on participatory approaches; (3) science communication education/training programs in higher education. Based on review results, it compares status of Taiwan and Japan.

Overall, this paper proposes long-term strategies to improve two-way science communication in Taiwan, particularly the effectiveness of participatory approaches by referring from Japanese experiences and a polite study of Taiwan Science Café in 2006. It is partly to respond to the recommendations of S&T policies in Taiwan.
The proposal includes the possibility of developing a model for public engagement activities that incorporate the needs of different stakeholders to achieve public literacy and understanding of S&T by informal learning system for the general public. This proposal is not only related to science communication strategies but also the issues of capacity building for science communication and its roles in different cultural societies.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Effectiveness of participatory approaches for science communication strategies
A comparative study in Taiwan and Japan

Chia-Hsin Chen   National Cheng Kung University

Public Understanding of Science and Technology (PUST) has been addressed and implemented in Japan since 2002 in Biotechnology Strategy Guidelines Japan (BT Japan). The BT Japan has clearly demonstrated to improve public engagement for science literacy in the general public in Japan. In response to White paper, there are various kinds of activities organized by different stakeholders such as governmental organizations (GO), governmental organizations (NGO), academic or research intuitions, and private sectors in Japan. Currently, Taiwan is still lacking of long-term science communication strategies or public engagement on S&T mechanisms. PUST or “science communication” is just at the beginning stages for Taiwanese stakeholders, particularly the governments of Taiwan. They are in the progress to establish S&T policies to improve science communication, including public engagement and understanding of S&T etc.

This paper reviews the current status and addresses the challenges and requirements it faces in implementing science communication strategies in Taiwan and Japan, by analyzing the following issues: (1) science communication strategies under the framework of biotechnology policies, from the policy to practice; (2) summaries the current public engagement activities by different stakeholders, particularly on participatory approaches; (3) science communication education/training programs in higher education. Based on review results, it compares status of Taiwan and Japan.

Overall, this paper proposes long-term strategies to improve two-way science communication in Taiwan, particularly the effectiveness of participatory approaches by referring from Japanese experiences and a polite study of Taiwan Science Café in 2006. It is partly to respond to the recommendations of S&T policies in Taiwan.
The proposal includes the possibility of developing a model for public engagement activities that incorporate the needs of different stakeholders to achieve public literacy and understanding of S&T by informal learning system for the general public. This proposal is not only related to science communication strategies but also the issues of capacity building for science communication and its roles in different cultural societies.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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