Background. On Monday 19 November 2007, the National Centre for Lifecourse Research (NCLR) was launched at Parliament in New Zealand. The centre unites research groups from five New Zealand universities and one Crown Research Institute, with the aim of translation and communication of academic research to a wide audience, including policymakers, NGOs, teachers, journalists, and the general public.

The centre’s research includes work on all aspects of human health, development, families, behaviours, and demography, including both individual and social outcomes. Work is multidisciplinary and cuts across all fields of health sciences and public health, with the aim of informing national government policy through to influencing individual behavioural changes.

Aims. This presentation will have three main aims: (1) to examine the methods developed to assess the usefulness and uptake of research published by partners of the National Centre for Lifecourse Research; (2) to report on initial impact of and outcomes from different methods of communication employed by the NCLR; and (3) to evaluate future directions for successful communication and engagement.

Traditional methods of assessment of academic research, such as citation indices, are specific to one end‐user group only, and do not measure the uptake of research into other areas. While they indicate the quality of research in the eyes of peers, they do not indicate the usefulness or relevance of that research to policymakers, journalists or the general public. The NCLR will measure use of published information in those other arenas, including popular media, website use and interaction, and uptake into government policy.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Impacts of lifecourse research on the people, policies and press of New Zealand

Karen Hartshorn   University of Otago

Background. On Monday 19 November 2007, the National Centre for Lifecourse Research (NCLR) was launched at Parliament in New Zealand. The centre unites research groups from five New Zealand universities and one Crown Research Institute, with the aim of translation and communication of academic research to a wide audience, including policymakers, NGOs, teachers, journalists, and the general public.

The centre’s research includes work on all aspects of human health, development, families, behaviours, and demography, including both individual and social outcomes. Work is multidisciplinary and cuts across all fields of health sciences and public health, with the aim of informing national government policy through to influencing individual behavioural changes.

Aims. This presentation will have three main aims: (1) to examine the methods developed to assess the usefulness and uptake of research published by partners of the National Centre for Lifecourse Research; (2) to report on initial impact of and outcomes from different methods of communication employed by the NCLR; and (3) to evaluate future directions for successful communication and engagement.

Traditional methods of assessment of academic research, such as citation indices, are specific to one end‐user group only, and do not measure the uptake of research into other areas. While they indicate the quality of research in the eyes of peers, they do not indicate the usefulness or relevance of that research to policymakers, journalists or the general public. The NCLR will measure use of published information in those other arenas, including popular media, website use and interaction, and uptake into government policy.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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