Understanding science and scientific thinking is essential for young people in our global society. However, to young people science and scientific problems often seem complicated and irrelevant. They often are introduced to science by reproducing of well‐known facts in the scope of isolated topics, which doesn't stimulate curiosity, interest, or dialogue with scientists to further their involvement in science. We are developing a different way of engaging young people from all over the world in science by means of communicating about molecular science through our new MoleClues web‐site. Our aim is enable youth to see the science around them and stimulate a dialogue between them and scentists. Besides encouraging them to ask questions, be curious and communicate about science, we have an opportunity to find out their thoughts and attitudes about molecular phenomena. We have written short stories which imbed ideas about molecular phenomena in accessible, intriguing context. Young people are encouraged to ask questions stimulated by the stories, quests, and other interactive features within the website's virtual world. Young PhD scientists are assigned as mentors to respond to each questioner, thus establishing a real bilateral communication between scientists and youth. On the MoleClues website, an Inquiry Prize had been established to encourage and reward those who show their involvement by asking questions of particular significance and sophistication. The winners will be invited to Molecular Frontiers yearly conferences, where they can meet scholars at the forefront of molecular science and fellow young science enthusiasts. Molecular Frontiers, the parent organization creating MoleClues, was founded in 2006 as a global non‐profit organization to promote understanding, appreciation and communication about molecular science. Its scientific advisory board, a group of internationally renowned scholars, includes eight Nobel laureates.

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MoleClues
The success of involving of young people into molecular science

Olga Stepanova   Göteborg Univ. and Chalmers Univ. of Technology

Ilan Chabay   Göteborg Univ. and Chalmers Univ. of Technology

Understanding science and scientific thinking is essential for young people in our global society. However, to young people science and scientific problems often seem complicated and irrelevant. They often are introduced to science by reproducing of well‐known facts in the scope of isolated topics, which doesn't stimulate curiosity, interest, or dialogue with scientists to further their involvement in science. We are developing a different way of engaging young people from all over the world in science by means of communicating about molecular science through our new MoleClues web‐site. Our aim is enable youth to see the science around them and stimulate a dialogue between them and scentists. Besides encouraging them to ask questions, be curious and communicate about science, we have an opportunity to find out their thoughts and attitudes about molecular phenomena. We have written short stories which imbed ideas about molecular phenomena in accessible, intriguing context. Young people are encouraged to ask questions stimulated by the stories, quests, and other interactive features within the website's virtual world. Young PhD scientists are assigned as mentors to respond to each questioner, thus establishing a real bilateral communication between scientists and youth. On the MoleClues website, an Inquiry Prize had been established to encourage and reward those who show their involvement by asking questions of particular significance and sophistication. The winners will be invited to Molecular Frontiers yearly conferences, where they can meet scholars at the forefront of molecular science and fellow young science enthusiasts. Molecular Frontiers, the parent organization creating MoleClues, was founded in 2006 as a global non‐profit organization to promote understanding, appreciation and communication about molecular science. Its scientific advisory board, a group of internationally renowned scholars, includes eight Nobel laureates.

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