If you are a layman, scientist, educationist or a media person, you may have observed that over the last few years there is a fast emerging trend where old communication methods are being rapidly replaced by a wider inquiry and dispensation based digital process. This shift in trend or attitude is definitely slightly upsetting for media persons who may have grown up under the earlier authoritative school of thought, where the reporter was placed at the centre of the fact dispensing process. This is particularly true for India where modern science communication methods continue to show great scope for improvement, despite recent advances and innovations.

In the present system, communicators have to write about science topics to encourage interest and learning in the average reader. There is more responsibility placed on the communicator to ‘learn’ for himself, as he uses his skills to effectively dispense knowledge. For effective science communication, there are a wide variety of methods that are possible before the average person. These methods include the time honoured traditional print media now largely propped up with the digital media. Perhaps more widespread in both the urban and rural scenario is the use of the print media chiefly making its presence felt in the form of books, pamphlets, newspapers and magazines to name a few. Emphasis on the type of each method varies from place to place in their implementation and efficacy.

There can be no doubt however, that in years to come, the role of computers, digital media, electronic publishing and the Internet in science communication, cannot be underestimated. The ease of communication and the comparative easy availability of recent, relevant knowledge from all over the world definitely make these communication methods a winner. The present paper deals with a spectrum of 21st century media methods; applied aspects for the future of science communication in India, their relevance in the global scenario, with emphasis on the use of computers, electronic publishing and the internet to serve mankind better.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science communication & media in India in the 21st century

Leslie B Godin   Department of Information & Communication Technology, The Westminster School, Dubai

Denzil J Godin   Department of Botany, Lucknow Christian College

If you are a layman, scientist, educationist or a media person, you may have observed that over the last few years there is a fast emerging trend where old communication methods are being rapidly replaced by a wider inquiry and dispensation based digital process. This shift in trend or attitude is definitely slightly upsetting for media persons who may have grown up under the earlier authoritative school of thought, where the reporter was placed at the centre of the fact dispensing process. This is particularly true for India where modern science communication methods continue to show great scope for improvement, despite recent advances and innovations.

In the present system, communicators have to write about science topics to encourage interest and learning in the average reader. There is more responsibility placed on the communicator to ‘learn’ for himself, as he uses his skills to effectively dispense knowledge. For effective science communication, there are a wide variety of methods that are possible before the average person. These methods include the time honoured traditional print media now largely propped up with the digital media. Perhaps more widespread in both the urban and rural scenario is the use of the print media chiefly making its presence felt in the form of books, pamphlets, newspapers and magazines to name a few. Emphasis on the type of each method varies from place to place in their implementation and efficacy.

There can be no doubt however, that in years to come, the role of computers, digital media, electronic publishing and the Internet in science communication, cannot be underestimated. The ease of communication and the comparative easy availability of recent, relevant knowledge from all over the world definitely make these communication methods a winner. The present paper deals with a spectrum of 21st century media methods; applied aspects for the future of science communication in India, their relevance in the global scenario, with emphasis on the use of computers, electronic publishing and the internet to serve mankind better.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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