Background. On Monday 19 November 2007, the National Centre for Lifecourse Research (NCLR) was launched at Parliament in New Zealand. The centre unites research groups from five New Zealand universities and one Crown Research Institute. The centre’s research is all about people, including health, development, families, behaviours, and demography, and examining individual and social outcomes. The main aim of the centre is translation and communication of academic research to a wide audience, including policymakers, NGOs, teachers, journalists, and the general public. National Identity Project. This presentation will explore the concept of translational research; making useful connections between academic research and stakeholder groups. We will use the first major project of the NCLR, a National Identity Project, as a case study in new methods of engaging and empowering.

The National Identity Project explores concepts of national identity(ies) in New Zealand as seen first through the ideas of prominent New Zealanders, and then through the eyes of the public. The theme stems from a central government focus on national identity. The end results of the project are not “business as usual” academic research outputs. The focus will be on communication, participation and engagement of different groups of people. Through interviews, videos, websites, internet forum and a book, we will forge active connections between the public and academic researchers by facilitating two-way dialogue. We will link researchers from the arts and sciences, and from both qualitative and quantitative research fields. Finally, the results from the project will be linked back to inform future government priorities.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

National Identity as a tool to facilitate engagement and empowerment of scientists, the public and policymakers

Karen Hartshorn   University of Otago

Richie Poulton   University of Otago

Background. On Monday 19 November 2007, the National Centre for Lifecourse Research (NCLR) was launched at Parliament in New Zealand. The centre unites research groups from five New Zealand universities and one Crown Research Institute. The centre’s research is all about people, including health, development, families, behaviours, and demography, and examining individual and social outcomes. The main aim of the centre is translation and communication of academic research to a wide audience, including policymakers, NGOs, teachers, journalists, and the general public. National Identity Project. This presentation will explore the concept of translational research; making useful connections between academic research and stakeholder groups. We will use the first major project of the NCLR, a National Identity Project, as a case study in new methods of engaging and empowering.

The National Identity Project explores concepts of national identity(ies) in New Zealand as seen first through the ideas of prominent New Zealanders, and then through the eyes of the public. The theme stems from a central government focus on national identity. The end results of the project are not “business as usual” academic research outputs. The focus will be on communication, participation and engagement of different groups of people. Through interviews, videos, websites, internet forum and a book, we will forge active connections between the public and academic researchers by facilitating two-way dialogue. We will link researchers from the arts and sciences, and from both qualitative and quantitative research fields. Finally, the results from the project will be linked back to inform future government priorities.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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