The author discusses the social education policies of the Beijing Regime (1912-1928) of the Republic of China
and the chain between the popular science and the change of culture. The popular science in social education policy was an important part of governmental education system. At first the charactor of traditional Chinese culture decided its goal and inclination in which S&T had been regarded as a tool for the rule of the upper class. After great president Yuan Shikai failed to crown himself as emperor, the old ruling culture was fully suspected and the ‘new’ S&T culture came out to challenge the old one. The ‘4th May 1919’ movement to pretest the transfer of German concession to Japan really alerted the whole Chinese society that change based on the ‘new’ culture was desperately needed. The conclusion is that popular science was introduced to China a little reluctantly from the late year of Qing Dynasty to 4th May 1919. When it is proved that old culture was ineffective the Chinese would adopt a ‘new’ culture based on modern S&T. So the main stream of Chinese society at that time was tipically conservative.

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Social education policy of the Beijing regime of the Republic of China (1912-1928)

Yunjing Zhang   China Research Institute for Science Popularisation

The author discusses the social education policies of the Beijing Regime (1912-1928) of the Republic of China
and the chain between the popular science and the change of culture. The popular science in social education policy was an important part of governmental education system. At first the charactor of traditional Chinese culture decided its goal and inclination in which S&T had been regarded as a tool for the rule of the upper class. After great president Yuan Shikai failed to crown himself as emperor, the old ruling culture was fully suspected and the ‘new’ S&T culture came out to challenge the old one. The ‘4th May 1919’ movement to pretest the transfer of German concession to Japan really alerted the whole Chinese society that change based on the ‘new’ culture was desperately needed. The conclusion is that popular science was introduced to China a little reluctantly from the late year of Qing Dynasty to 4th May 1919. When it is proved that old culture was ineffective the Chinese would adopt a ‘new’ culture based on modern S&T. So the main stream of Chinese society at that time was tipically conservative.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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