Every two years a Science Week and a Science Festival takes place in Flanders, Belgium. All Flemish universities, colleges, science organizations, etc are asked to take part in these events. In 2008 the European University College Brussels will participate for the seventh time. Over the years the science communicator and the researchers of the college volunteering to organize the activities for the science week (which is held at the college itself) and the science festival (which is held in a big event hall), have gathered a large amount of do's and don'ts concerning the organization and the content of a science event like this. For each Science Week the science communicator and researchers of every participating college or university have to create new science activities for 16 to 18‐year old high school students. Depending on the size of your university or college a certain amount of activities are offered to these students andtheir teachers during the Science Week. The European University College Brussels creates and offersaround 30 different activities.At the three days’ Science Festival every college and university gets an exhibition booth to fill with funscience activities for the broad public (mostly families with small children).

Questions answered during this session:How do you motivate researchers and professors to participate in events like these?Researchers and professors don’t get accreditation or money for their participation, how do youreward them for volunteering for a science communication event?After a couple of science events you notice that some of the very motivated researchers/professors arenot good communicators, how do you deal with this?How do you know if a new science activity will be succesful with the broader public?The government evaluates every edition of the Science Week and Festival. Are the results of thisevaluation useful for your university or college? And can you really measure the impact of such ascience event? This session is not a presentation of research results, but rather a best practice example from particularexperiences concerning the organization of science activities for large science events.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Participation in a government funded Science Week and Science Festival
The do's and don’ts for a university college

Ellen Geerts   European University College Brussels

Marc Lambaerts   Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen

Every two years a Science Week and a Science Festival takes place in Flanders, Belgium. All Flemish universities, colleges, science organizations, etc are asked to take part in these events. In 2008 the European University College Brussels will participate for the seventh time. Over the years the science communicator and the researchers of the college volunteering to organize the activities for the science week (which is held at the college itself) and the science festival (which is held in a big event hall), have gathered a large amount of do's and don'ts concerning the organization and the content of a science event like this. For each Science Week the science communicator and researchers of every participating college or university have to create new science activities for 16 to 18‐year old high school students. Depending on the size of your university or college a certain amount of activities are offered to these students andtheir teachers during the Science Week. The European University College Brussels creates and offersaround 30 different activities.At the three days’ Science Festival every college and university gets an exhibition booth to fill with funscience activities for the broad public (mostly families with small children).

Questions answered during this session:How do you motivate researchers and professors to participate in events like these?Researchers and professors don’t get accreditation or money for their participation, how do youreward them for volunteering for a science communication event?After a couple of science events you notice that some of the very motivated researchers/professors arenot good communicators, how do you deal with this?How do you know if a new science activity will be succesful with the broader public?The government evaluates every edition of the Science Week and Festival. Are the results of thisevaluation useful for your university or college? And can you really measure the impact of such ascience event? This session is not a presentation of research results, but rather a best practice example from particularexperiences concerning the organization of science activities for large science events.

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