The  public  utilize  many  sorts  of  media  to  improve  scientific  literacy.  Television,  newspapers, magazines, books, museums, science centers, radio, public lectures and internet are available to the public for this purpose.

The  author  has  analysed  the  trends  in  the  science  sections  of  three  major  newspapers  in  Japan  for  the past  forty  years,  since  Sputnik  launching  in  1957,  and  has  discussed  the  influences  of  Sputnik  to  the science reporting of newspapers.

This paper reports the trends in the science sections of almost all daily newspapers published in Japan and studies the present conditions of science reporters. Then it discusses the status quo of science reporting in  Japanese  newspapers.  The  author  supposes  that  the  science  section  of  Japanese  newspapers  is  an established and  indispensable page  for  the  public  in  the  modern society.  Major  national  newspapers hire their own science reporters in Japan. The number of  science reporters in  those  major papers ranges from 10  to  20. But  the number of  reporters usually depends on  the  circulation of papers. The  local newspapers that has smaller circulation does not hire science reporters or hires a small number. Those newspapers that do  not  hire  science  reporters  publish  science  news  through  news  agencies  or  news  written  by  their  own reporters for city news and cultural news.
 

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

A survey of science reporting in Japan
The trends in the science section of Japanese newspapers

Kenji Makino   Science University of Tokyo

The  public  utilize  many  sorts  of  media  to  improve  scientific  literacy.  Television,  newspapers, magazines, books, museums, science centers, radio, public lectures and internet are available to the public for this purpose.

The  author  has  analysed  the  trends  in  the  science  sections  of  three  major  newspapers  in  Japan  for  the past  forty  years,  since  Sputnik  launching  in  1957,  and  has  discussed  the  influences  of  Sputnik  to  the science reporting of newspapers.

This paper reports the trends in the science sections of almost all daily newspapers published in Japan and studies the present conditions of science reporters. Then it discusses the status quo of science reporting in  Japanese  newspapers.  The  author  supposes  that  the  science  section  of  Japanese  newspapers  is  an established and  indispensable page  for  the  public  in  the  modern society.  Major  national  newspapers hire their own science reporters in Japan. The number of  science reporters in  those  major papers ranges from 10  to  20. But  the number of  reporters usually depends on  the  circulation of papers. The  local newspapers that has smaller circulation does not hire science reporters or hires a small number. Those newspapers that do  not  hire  science  reporters  publish  science  news  through  news  agencies  or  news  written  by  their  own reporters for city news and cultural news.
 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP