This  paper  aims  at  investigating  the  development  in  the  Italian  press  of  the  public  debate  on  cloning after the announcement of the Dolly experiment. The analysis is focused mainly on the interaction among the various social actors -- such as scientists, social movements, political parties, the Catholic Church and so on -- within the "public space" created by the media.

The purpose is to show not only their different positions about cloning, but even how the debate about cloning  shifted  progressively into  the  debate  about  the  problem of  assisted  fertilization and  therefore  into the general debate about the human procreation process at present taking place in Italy. In this respect it is important to notice that in Italy there is no regulation of cloning practices, but it is still more important to know  that  Italy  has  no  regulation  of  assisted  fertilization.  This  complete  lack  of  norms  means  that  the various social actors are committed to legitimate their perspective not only on cloning but on the "natural" order of  human procreation too.

The juxtaposition of such opposing issues has become visible in the public arena, and may possibly be settled by the media, this resulting in great confusion in terms of problems, issues and information.
 
 

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

And the man descended from the sheep
The public debate on cloning in the Italian press

Federico Neresini   University of Padova, Italy

This  paper  aims  at  investigating  the  development  in  the  Italian  press  of  the  public  debate  on  cloning after the announcement of the Dolly experiment. The analysis is focused mainly on the interaction among the various social actors -- such as scientists, social movements, political parties, the Catholic Church and so on -- within the "public space" created by the media.

The purpose is to show not only their different positions about cloning, but even how the debate about cloning  shifted  progressively into  the  debate  about  the  problem of  assisted  fertilization and  therefore  into the general debate about the human procreation process at present taking place in Italy. In this respect it is important to notice that in Italy there is no regulation of cloning practices, but it is still more important to know  that  Italy  has  no  regulation  of  assisted  fertilization.  This  complete  lack  of  norms  means  that  the various social actors are committed to legitimate their perspective not only on cloning but on the "natural" order of  human procreation too.

The juxtaposition of such opposing issues has become visible in the public arena, and may possibly be settled by the media, this resulting in great confusion in terms of problems, issues and information.
 
 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP