Research and Development in Children’s Creative Science Literature: The Kerala Story ABSTRACT Jayaraman A.P.and Sivadas S. Background: Recognizing children’s innate affinity for stories, a group of Keralese Science communicators planned, organized, executed and monitored a comprehensive Children’s Creative Science Literature (CCSL) program since 1965 elevating the peak value of an exclusive science content flagship magazine to 100,000 with an outreach of 1 million of networked parents, teachers and children. Hypothesis: Postulating that stories constitute a powerful medium for creating scientific literacy and numeracy among children, a storymaking programme was designed based on current research findings published in peer reviewed reference journals. The objective was to initiate the community to the Scientific method. Methods: Story-friendly science news is retrieved from research journals and is enriched with background information from references. A crude fit with a folk tale is attempted or the folk is morphed for the absorption of the selected content. The scientific method is illustrated with animal stories with embedded facts from sociobiology. In a second method, freewheeling conversation between a child the personified object is employed. A mutant of this method takes the form of autobiographical narratology and has been used for chemical elements and for newly discovered behaviour of animals. Results: The paper presents four protocols developed for CCSL to illustrate the different steps of the scientific Method with animal characters, to explain the concepts of reverse osmosis separation with a popular Indian folk tale, the lotus effect with a child initiated constructed conversation and the soliloquy of Hydrogen as the fuel of the future. Immortal characters like Earthworm Mamman are the creations of CCSL. Conclusion: The Keralese CCSL strategies have demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of science stories for children, developed a cadre of creative writers with core competencies and generated a viable and vibrant publishing enterprises.

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Research and development in children's creative science literature
The kerala story

Jayaraman Athrayil   National centre for Science Communicators

Research and Development in Children’s Creative Science Literature: The Kerala Story ABSTRACT Jayaraman A.P.and Sivadas S. Background: Recognizing children’s innate affinity for stories, a group of Keralese Science communicators planned, organized, executed and monitored a comprehensive Children’s Creative Science Literature (CCSL) program since 1965 elevating the peak value of an exclusive science content flagship magazine to 100,000 with an outreach of 1 million of networked parents, teachers and children. Hypothesis: Postulating that stories constitute a powerful medium for creating scientific literacy and numeracy among children, a storymaking programme was designed based on current research findings published in peer reviewed reference journals. The objective was to initiate the community to the Scientific method. Methods: Story-friendly science news is retrieved from research journals and is enriched with background information from references. A crude fit with a folk tale is attempted or the folk is morphed for the absorption of the selected content. The scientific method is illustrated with animal stories with embedded facts from sociobiology. In a second method, freewheeling conversation between a child the personified object is employed. A mutant of this method takes the form of autobiographical narratology and has been used for chemical elements and for newly discovered behaviour of animals. Results: The paper presents four protocols developed for CCSL to illustrate the different steps of the scientific Method with animal characters, to explain the concepts of reverse osmosis separation with a popular Indian folk tale, the lotus effect with a child initiated constructed conversation and the soliloquy of Hydrogen as the fuel of the future. Immortal characters like Earthworm Mamman are the creations of CCSL. Conclusion: The Keralese CCSL strategies have demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of science stories for children, developed a cadre of creative writers with core competencies and generated a viable and vibrant publishing enterprises.

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