Within a few years, science blogging has emerged as new genre for science communication. Many bloggers argue that the genre is a way to increase public engagement with science. But is science blogging really best understood in terms of 'science' and 'the public'? Or does the phenomenon of science blogging suggest other dichotomies?

This paper suggests that science blogging ‐‐as well as other genres for science communication – are better conceptualized in terms of M. Hardt and T. Negri’s Deleuzean distinction between 'Empire' and 'multitude'. Global technoscience is financed and managed by a network of national and transnational state organisations and corporations, while the overwhelming number of laboratory and field workers constitute a global knowledge ‘multitude’. These different positions in the global technoscientific field entail two different domains of communication practices which correspond, roughly, to the cultures of 'Empire' and 'multitude', respectively. The paper will discuss some of the features of science blogging in terms of ‘multitude’ cultural practices.

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Science communication between ‘Empire’ and ‘multitude’

Zhimin Zhang   China Research Institute for Science Popularization

Within a few years, science blogging has emerged as new genre for science communication. Many bloggers argue that the genre is a way to increase public engagement with science. But is science blogging really best understood in terms of 'science' and 'the public'? Or does the phenomenon of science blogging suggest other dichotomies?

This paper suggests that science blogging ‐‐as well as other genres for science communication – are better conceptualized in terms of M. Hardt and T. Negri’s Deleuzean distinction between 'Empire' and 'multitude'. Global technoscience is financed and managed by a network of national and transnational state organisations and corporations, while the overwhelming number of laboratory and field workers constitute a global knowledge ‘multitude’. These different positions in the global technoscientific field entail two different domains of communication practices which correspond, roughly, to the cultures of 'Empire' and 'multitude', respectively. The paper will discuss some of the features of science blogging in terms of ‘multitude’ cultural practices.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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