This paper puts forward a model for the study of the popularisation of science history. The model, based on qualitative methodologies, distinguishes four schools each with their own fundamental characteristics, their authors and their seminal works. The first of these is the school born out of the Italian Renaissance, whose greatest figure was Galileo. The second school is the French one which reached its apogee in the 18th century; authors like Fontenelle, Buffon, Diderot and, already in the 19th, Flammarion comprise its best known representatives. The third school is the Germano-Prussian one. Its most important figure was Albert Einstein, a nonpareil writer and lecturer. The fourth and last school is the powerful Anglo-Saxon one. This school, the latest and most preponderant, counts popularisers like Darwin, Gamow, Asimov, Sagan and Gould among its numbers.

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An approach to the history of the main traditions of science popularisation

Sergi Cortiñas Rovira   Universitat Pompeu Fabra

This paper puts forward a model for the study of the popularisation of science history. The model, based on qualitative methodologies, distinguishes four schools each with their own fundamental characteristics, their authors and their seminal works. The first of these is the school born out of the Italian Renaissance, whose greatest figure was Galileo. The second school is the French one which reached its apogee in the 18th century; authors like Fontenelle, Buffon, Diderot and, already in the 19th, Flammarion comprise its best known representatives. The third school is the Germano-Prussian one. Its most important figure was Albert Einstein, a nonpareil writer and lecturer. The fourth and last school is the powerful Anglo-Saxon one. This school, the latest and most preponderant, counts popularisers like Darwin, Gamow, Asimov, Sagan and Gould among its numbers.

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