Background: Public understanding of science and technology has gradually turned into public engagement of science and technology. That implies a different communication approach with specific target groups.

Objective/ Hypotheses: It also implies that those involved – from the researcher to the intended users of the research results ‐ have a joint responsibility. This responsibility must be shared right at the beginning of a research programme or project. All parties have to work together, interactively, in order to achieve the ultimate aim: the use of the research results in everyday practise.

Methods: Two major programmes in the field of social sciences, financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, will illustrate the new trends in communicating (social) sciences. One of the programmes is about educational research in the broadest sense of the word. The other deals with conflict and security. These are perfect examples of mutual concern of researchers and specific groups in the public domain.

Results: This paper shows how the two research programmes were established, what topics were chosen, which of these were transformed into research questions, and in what way the new knowledge will find its way to the intended users. Moreover, the paper explains how the involved parties are coping with the translations of empirical evidence into innovations and problem solving.

Conclusions: he close alignment between academic research and issues practitioners have to deal with on a daily bases, ensures a surplus value. It surpasses just a formal form of cooperation, usually only at the end of the research project. The involvement of all parties is guaranteed during the whole research process, from brainstorm sessions to the actual implementation.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science for society ‐ knowledge dissemination and utilisation

Alfred Wald   NWO ‐ Social Sciences

Background: Public understanding of science and technology has gradually turned into public engagement of science and technology. That implies a different communication approach with specific target groups.

Objective/ Hypotheses: It also implies that those involved – from the researcher to the intended users of the research results ‐ have a joint responsibility. This responsibility must be shared right at the beginning of a research programme or project. All parties have to work together, interactively, in order to achieve the ultimate aim: the use of the research results in everyday practise.

Methods: Two major programmes in the field of social sciences, financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, will illustrate the new trends in communicating (social) sciences. One of the programmes is about educational research in the broadest sense of the word. The other deals with conflict and security. These are perfect examples of mutual concern of researchers and specific groups in the public domain.

Results: This paper shows how the two research programmes were established, what topics were chosen, which of these were transformed into research questions, and in what way the new knowledge will find its way to the intended users. Moreover, the paper explains how the involved parties are coping with the translations of empirical evidence into innovations and problem solving.

Conclusions: he close alignment between academic research and issues practitioners have to deal with on a daily bases, ensures a surplus value. It surpasses just a formal form of cooperation, usually only at the end of the research project. The involvement of all parties is guaranteed during the whole research process, from brainstorm sessions to the actual implementation.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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