Once upon a time the theater director said to the researcher: "Tell me a story about your research”. The researcher started talking, like researchers enjoy to do. He travelled through words like statistical thermodynamics, phase‐transition of lipids and polymers conformation complexity and speculated about the many roads still left to travel. After some time he entered an area filled with "spheres of fat", encapsulation of chemotherapeutics, and treatment of cancer. Now the interest of the instructor was triggered. This was a story about curing cancer, this was a story he longed to understand and he urged the researcher to take him further down this road...

In this presentation you are introduced to three persons who are involved in the Science Theater Play "The Magic Bullet" that was a result of the above conversation. First you meet the researcher, university professor and actor in‐spe, whose fundamental research on biophysics, for the past 30 years, lays the foundation of the play. Then you are introduced to the theater director who has dedicated his career to create insight and realization of the inherent drama of scientific research by using the theater’s artistic means. Finally you meet the research ‐ apprentice who has dedicated her Ph.D. study to measure the potential of "The Magic Bullet" to "trigger" a situational interest in students from Upper Secondary School.

Science Theater Plays are increasingly staged in order to improve public understanding and appreciation of science and to communicate a scientific topic that is difficult to understand but highly relevant. But how do you make a Science Theater Play? What is the object of such a play? What is the researcher’s part in the play? And what is the "interestingness" of the plays? These are the questions we, the researcher, theater director and Ph.D. student, want to address in the following presentation.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science research narratives on stage ‐why is it interesting?

Stinne Hansen   University of Southern Denmark

Ole Mouritsen   University of Southern Denmark

Bent Nørgaard   University of Southern Denmark

Once upon a time the theater director said to the researcher: "Tell me a story about your research”. The researcher started talking, like researchers enjoy to do. He travelled through words like statistical thermodynamics, phase‐transition of lipids and polymers conformation complexity and speculated about the many roads still left to travel. After some time he entered an area filled with "spheres of fat", encapsulation of chemotherapeutics, and treatment of cancer. Now the interest of the instructor was triggered. This was a story about curing cancer, this was a story he longed to understand and he urged the researcher to take him further down this road...

In this presentation you are introduced to three persons who are involved in the Science Theater Play "The Magic Bullet" that was a result of the above conversation. First you meet the researcher, university professor and actor in‐spe, whose fundamental research on biophysics, for the past 30 years, lays the foundation of the play. Then you are introduced to the theater director who has dedicated his career to create insight and realization of the inherent drama of scientific research by using the theater’s artistic means. Finally you meet the research ‐ apprentice who has dedicated her Ph.D. study to measure the potential of "The Magic Bullet" to "trigger" a situational interest in students from Upper Secondary School.

Science Theater Plays are increasingly staged in order to improve public understanding and appreciation of science and to communicate a scientific topic that is difficult to understand but highly relevant. But how do you make a Science Theater Play? What is the object of such a play? What is the researcher’s part in the play? And what is the "interestingness" of the plays? These are the questions we, the researcher, theater director and Ph.D. student, want to address in the following presentation.

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