This paper begins with the premise that science communicators – though a diverse breed - are all facilitators of social/public participation in science. Given this, four short examples are presented deriving from the author’s prior experience in anthropology and psychology. The examples are summarised as; culture clash, notions of rationality, relativism and culture change. Using these, the importance of social awareness to science communication theory and practice is highlighted. It is argued that science communication without recognition of, and responsiveness to, social context is science evangelism.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Maximising social participation in science communication
Some lessons from anthropology and psychology

Rod Lamberts   The Australian National University

This paper begins with the premise that science communicators – though a diverse breed - are all facilitators of social/public participation in science. Given this, four short examples are presented deriving from the author’s prior experience in anthropology and psychology. The examples are summarised as; culture clash, notions of rationality, relativism and culture change. Using these, the importance of social awareness to science communication theory and practice is highlighted. It is argued that science communication without recognition of, and responsiveness to, social context is science evangelism.

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