Science for Development is a grass-root association of young Portuguese and African researchers, working voluntarily to promote internationalisation of scientific activity and the application of science and technology in the developing world. Activities target researchers, through technical workshops aimed at specific local demands, and junior graduates, through discussionbased courses aimed at promoting the scientific activity. We believe that the structure and mode of action of Science for Development represents an alternative to address the needs of science development in poorer countries. Today, initiatives such as this face several challenges: which tools can be developed to broaden our audience in the developing world and engage more people with science? How can the impact of activities be evaluated? How can we ensure their long-term effects?

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Promoting science in developing countries - A young scientists' initiative in Mozambique and Angola

Margarida Trindade   Association Science for Development, Portugal

Ana Godinho Coutinho   Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência

Mónica Bettencourt Dias   University of Cambridge

Science for Development is a grass-root association of young Portuguese and African researchers, working voluntarily to promote internationalisation of scientific activity and the application of science and technology in the developing world. Activities target researchers, through technical workshops aimed at specific local demands, and junior graduates, through discussionbased courses aimed at promoting the scientific activity. We believe that the structure and mode of action of Science for Development represents an alternative to address the needs of science development in poorer countries. Today, initiatives such as this face several challenges: which tools can be developed to broaden our audience in the developing world and engage more people with science? How can the impact of activities be evaluated? How can we ensure their long-term effects?

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