Science policy leaders heavily rely both on traditional print and online versions of the same or similar media. Although science policy leaders report using a wide array of information sources, they have differential levels of trust in various sources. For example, reports from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences or articles in Science or Nature are widely trusted. In contrast, science policy leaders report a low level of trust in news reports on CNN or a network news show. There is a strong trend toward the use of online resources for finding and obtaining policy-relevant information.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Science information needs of U.S policy makers

Rick E. Borchelt   Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Melissa L. Withers   Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

Science policy leaders heavily rely both on traditional print and online versions of the same or similar media. Although science policy leaders report using a wide array of information sources, they have differential levels of trust in various sources. For example, reports from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences or articles in Science or Nature are widely trusted. In contrast, science policy leaders report a low level of trust in news reports on CNN or a network news show. There is a strong trend toward the use of online resources for finding and obtaining policy-relevant information.

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