Background Research collaboration is increasingly interdisciplinary in nature, with those working in traditional scientific fields of science, technology, engineering and medicine recognising the value of collaboration with those working in social sciences, humanities and arts.

Objective: This paper explores the challenges and opportunities for participatory science communication from cross‐sectoral research teams.

Methods: We draw examples from researched case studies to describe how cross‐sectoral collaboration positions science within the social context. We also look at how cross‐sectoral communication relates to current models of science communication.

Results and conclusions: Participatory science communication can be stimulated from cross‐sectoral collaboration. The case studies we have investigated demonstrate the usefulness of cross‐sectoral collaboration in providing new ways to situate science in the social context. By providing ways to incorporate the negotiation of meaning, social values and critiques of science, these projects are providing mechanisms of public engagement and also changing the approaches of institutions and the ways in which science is conducted.

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Situating science in the social context with cross‐sectoral collaboration

Michelle Riedlinger   Econnect Communication

Jenni Metcalfe   Econnect Communication

Background Research collaboration is increasingly interdisciplinary in nature, with those working in traditional scientific fields of science, technology, engineering and medicine recognising the value of collaboration with those working in social sciences, humanities and arts.

Objective: This paper explores the challenges and opportunities for participatory science communication from cross‐sectoral research teams.

Methods: We draw examples from researched case studies to describe how cross‐sectoral collaboration positions science within the social context. We also look at how cross‐sectoral communication relates to current models of science communication.

Results and conclusions: Participatory science communication can be stimulated from cross‐sectoral collaboration. The case studies we have investigated demonstrate the usefulness of cross‐sectoral collaboration in providing new ways to situate science in the social context. By providing ways to incorporate the negotiation of meaning, social values and critiques of science, these projects are providing mechanisms of public engagement and also changing the approaches of institutions and the ways in which science is conducted.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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