Skype ‐ or any other Voice Over Internet Protocol ‐ can be a valuable tool for publicising events and issues.

Christina Scott, Africa news editor of the Science and Development Network open‐access news website runs Saturday afternoon Skypecasts for reporters affiliated with the World Federation of Science Journalists' mentoring programme. Skypecasts are press conferences where nobody knows that the erudite speaker is actually wearing pyjamas, because everything is done over the telephone lines, like radio.

While hidden Skypecasts can be used to plan and discuss events and projects with colleagues, or to hold press conferences with selected reporters, public Skypecasts are a bit like a press conference held in the middle of a busy road ‐ speak fast, or get run over!

The advantage of hosting a Skypecast ‐ as opposed to a Skype conference call ‐ is that you can have up to 100 people on at a given time, and the host controls the microphones. Participants signal if they want to speak. As long as you have broadband internet connections, a computer with a sound card, the latest version of Skype and a headset, you don't have to cope with complicated transport and logistical issues. And it's free for everyone who is already on Skype. Bring your laptop, plug in your microphone and participate in a Skypecast to tell reporters across the world about PCST 2008 ‐ and see if it works for you.

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Skypecasting Science

Christina Scott   Science Media Stokvel

Skype ‐ or any other Voice Over Internet Protocol ‐ can be a valuable tool for publicising events and issues.

Christina Scott, Africa news editor of the Science and Development Network open‐access news website runs Saturday afternoon Skypecasts for reporters affiliated with the World Federation of Science Journalists' mentoring programme. Skypecasts are press conferences where nobody knows that the erudite speaker is actually wearing pyjamas, because everything is done over the telephone lines, like radio.

While hidden Skypecasts can be used to plan and discuss events and projects with colleagues, or to hold press conferences with selected reporters, public Skypecasts are a bit like a press conference held in the middle of a busy road ‐ speak fast, or get run over!

The advantage of hosting a Skypecast ‐ as opposed to a Skype conference call ‐ is that you can have up to 100 people on at a given time, and the host controls the microphones. Participants signal if they want to speak. As long as you have broadband internet connections, a computer with a sound card, the latest version of Skype and a headset, you don't have to cope with complicated transport and logistical issues. And it's free for everyone who is already on Skype. Bring your laptop, plug in your microphone and participate in a Skypecast to tell reporters across the world about PCST 2008 ‐ and see if it works for you.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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