China  Association  for  Science  and  Technology  (CAST)  is  a  mass  organization  in  science  and technology  field,  which  composed  of  170  national  natural  science  and  technology  societies,  as well  as  it  branch  organizations  in  every  province,  city,  and  county  of  China.   While  organizing academic  exchange  programmes  so  as  to  enhance  the  development  of  R  &  D  in  science,  CAST has been taking science popularization as its important role during the last 50 years.

As  a  developing  country  with  the  most  population,  China  has  its  feature  of  uneven  social  and economic  development.   Therefore,  how  to  plan  and  carry  out  proper  science  communication programmes  for  the  people  with  different  cultural,  educational,  and  economic  background,  has been  a  huge  challenge  that  CAST  can’t  avoid.   After  years  of  practices,  CAST  has  successfully established  its  science  communication  network  throughout  China:   setting  up  science  museums as  leading  science  communication  institutions;  relying  on  the  enthusiasms  of  scientists  to implement  science  outreach  programmes  for  farmers,  young  people,  as  well  as  government officials; Using mass-media to promote public understanding of science.

While introducing CAST’s experiences in  mobilizing science communities for the public science communication,  the  author  will  also  discuss  the  new  challenges  and  problems  that  nowadays CAST  still  struggling  with:  like  the  interaction  between  new  market-economy  and  traditional non-profit  activities,  using  new  media  of  information  age  to  communicate  science,  etc.   The author  expects,  through  the  PCST  conference,  to  share  the  information  and  experiences  with colleagues  who  have  same  concerns  and  establish  the  international  collaborations  for  a  better public understanding in science and technology.

 
 

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 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

China Association for Science and Technology
A leading organization in science communication of China

Donghong Cheng   China Association for Science and Technology (CAST)

China  Association  for  Science  and  Technology  (CAST)  is  a  mass  organization  in  science  and technology  field,  which  composed  of  170  national  natural  science  and  technology  societies,  as well  as  it  branch  organizations  in  every  province,  city,  and  county  of  China.   While  organizing academic  exchange  programmes  so  as  to  enhance  the  development  of  R  &  D  in  science,  CAST has been taking science popularization as its important role during the last 50 years.

As  a  developing  country  with  the  most  population,  China  has  its  feature  of  uneven  social  and economic  development.   Therefore,  how  to  plan  and  carry  out  proper  science  communication programmes  for  the  people  with  different  cultural,  educational,  and  economic  background,  has been  a  huge  challenge  that  CAST  can’t  avoid.   After  years  of  practices,  CAST  has  successfully established  its  science  communication  network  throughout  China:   setting  up  science  museums as  leading  science  communication  institutions;  relying  on  the  enthusiasms  of  scientists  to implement  science  outreach  programmes  for  farmers,  young  people,  as  well  as  government officials; Using mass-media to promote public understanding of science.

While introducing CAST’s experiences in  mobilizing science communities for the public science communication,  the  author  will  also  discuss  the  new  challenges  and  problems  that  nowadays CAST  still  struggling  with:  like  the  interaction  between  new  market-economy  and  traditional non-profit  activities,  using  new  media  of  information  age  to  communicate  science,  etc.   The author  expects,  through  the  PCST  conference,  to  share  the  information  and  experiences  with colleagues  who  have  same  concerns  and  establish  the  international  collaborations  for  a  better public understanding in science and technology.

 
 

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