Recognizing children’s affinity for stories, a group of Indian scientists dedicated to Science for Social Revolution organized themselves into task forces to transmute stories to communicate science to children aged nine to fourteen. An exclusive Children’s science magazine started in 1970 peaked to individual subscription of 100,000 copies in a month. A significant inventory of science stories and a rich tradition of narration and enacting were established in the Southern State of Kerala in India for over 30 years along with the acceptance of Children’s Creative Science Literature (CCSL) as a genre by commercial publishers. Selected science and maths stories, translated by the authors into English, were presented at the Asian and International Storytelling Conferences at Singapore 2005, 06 and 07. This paper presents an overview of the problems encountered in science storytelling, the literary vacuum in the genre, the methodologies of abinitio creation of science stories in fact‐fiction fusion model, the transcreation of folk tales with the sub‐strtatum of the scientific method and the business success of CCSL in Kerala and describes the sourcing for story themes, a protocol of creative narratology, illustrations and dramatization with examples. The story of an African Lion, Vulture and Chimpanzee demonstrates the full blown Scientific Method to children. Potential for teaching mathematics through stories is discussed. The authors’ four decade long experience of science story‐writing telling enacting‐and know how transfer to the teachers as a flexible classroom tool will be shared and a strategy for managing science communication with the proper mix of subjects will be discussed. People’s Science Movement has demonstrated the low‐cost and high‐value efficacy of science‐storytelling as an interactive performance‐art form and as a designed co‐creative process, which is personal, interpretive, and uniquely human. Listening and verbal skills in students can be developed by teachers by introducing new vocabulary that can be easily comprehended within the context of the story.

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Storytelling
A creative classroom tool in science communication.

Jayaraman Poothanayil   National centre for Science communicators

Recognizing children’s affinity for stories, a group of Indian scientists dedicated to Science for Social Revolution organized themselves into task forces to transmute stories to communicate science to children aged nine to fourteen. An exclusive Children’s science magazine started in 1970 peaked to individual subscription of 100,000 copies in a month. A significant inventory of science stories and a rich tradition of narration and enacting were established in the Southern State of Kerala in India for over 30 years along with the acceptance of Children’s Creative Science Literature (CCSL) as a genre by commercial publishers. Selected science and maths stories, translated by the authors into English, were presented at the Asian and International Storytelling Conferences at Singapore 2005, 06 and 07. This paper presents an overview of the problems encountered in science storytelling, the literary vacuum in the genre, the methodologies of abinitio creation of science stories in fact‐fiction fusion model, the transcreation of folk tales with the sub‐strtatum of the scientific method and the business success of CCSL in Kerala and describes the sourcing for story themes, a protocol of creative narratology, illustrations and dramatization with examples. The story of an African Lion, Vulture and Chimpanzee demonstrates the full blown Scientific Method to children. Potential for teaching mathematics through stories is discussed. The authors’ four decade long experience of science story‐writing telling enacting‐and know how transfer to the teachers as a flexible classroom tool will be shared and a strategy for managing science communication with the proper mix of subjects will be discussed. People’s Science Movement has demonstrated the low‐cost and high‐value efficacy of science‐storytelling as an interactive performance‐art form and as a designed co‐creative process, which is personal, interpretive, and uniquely human. Listening and verbal skills in students can be developed by teachers by introducing new vocabulary that can be easily comprehended within the context of the story.

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP