The UK’s Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council is a government agency which funds research and training in particle physics, astronomy and space science.  Our vigorous PUS programme has been running for five years now, and I present the main outcomes, together with the results of evaluation.  Our science communications work is mainly aimed at young people and opinion formers, drawing on the inspirational value of our sciences and Government’s perception of the need for awareness and appreciation of the work of British scientists.

Communication by our scientists is probably still the closest to the deficit model (for good reasons).  However the recent influential UK Parliamentary report ‘Science and Society’ calls for more ‘debate and dialogue’ and I will present options for two-way communications in our area, including issues of public concern.

Our own PUS research and evaluation includes 
  survey of prior knowledge and interest levels amongst visitors to science museums 
  surveys of science teachers and young people (14-18) on their needs
  surveys of scientists in our research community on their outreach work

I will discuss how our future policy will be influenced by (a) results from the above evaluations, and (b) outcomes from the Government/Wellcome Trust review of science communications in the UK (‘Science and the Public’, 2000)

 

  

 

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PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

Practice and evaluation of science communications in the UK

Robin Clegg   Public Understanding of Science and Technology Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

The UK’s Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council is a government agency which funds research and training in particle physics, astronomy and space science.  Our vigorous PUS programme has been running for five years now, and I present the main outcomes, together with the results of evaluation.  Our science communications work is mainly aimed at young people and opinion formers, drawing on the inspirational value of our sciences and Government’s perception of the need for awareness and appreciation of the work of British scientists.

Communication by our scientists is probably still the closest to the deficit model (for good reasons).  However the recent influential UK Parliamentary report ‘Science and Society’ calls for more ‘debate and dialogue’ and I will present options for two-way communications in our area, including issues of public concern.

Our own PUS research and evaluation includes 
  survey of prior knowledge and interest levels amongst visitors to science museums 
  surveys of science teachers and young people (14-18) on their needs
  surveys of scientists in our research community on their outreach work

I will discuss how our future policy will be influenced by (a) results from the above evaluations, and (b) outcomes from the Government/Wellcome Trust review of science communications in the UK (‘Science and the Public’, 2000)

 

  

 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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