Introduction:Quark Net pioneers the use of the Internet to partner teachers and students with the two largest experimental collaborations in the history of physics. Eventually 60 U.S. universities and labs involved in the new detectors at CERN and Fermilab will have high school physics teachers participating in research in the summer.  Then students will use live, on-line data to participate in actual research, while learning the fundamental concepts of physics.

University/Lab and High School Partnerships:In each of the five summers 24 teachers hold eight-week research appointments to work on research related to Fermilab and CERN experiments. Each team of teachers and their mentors establishes a center at their home university or research institution and leads a workshop for 10 teachers who join the group during the second summer.

Internet and the Classroom:To foster a local community among scientists, teachers, and students, communication is encouraged through workshops, Saturday meetings, e-mail, and personal contact.  The teachers are also part of a national community, which begins when they attend a one-week institute at Fermilab.  E-mail, listservs, and national meetings allow them to continue sharing ideas  with scientists and other teachers.  Students also communicate with scientists and other students through e-mail;  some will be selected to visit Fermilab and CERN and to report to other students by webcasts.
 
Teachers experience scientific research and then apply that understanding to their teaching.  They create data sets, experiments,and inquiry-based experiences that enable them to teach the basic concepts of introductory physics in a context that students find exciting.  What is new is the use of Internet for data sets and on-line experiments.  Examples of these will be shown.

Developers of Quark Net: Quark Net has been developed by a collaboration of teachers, educators and physicists.   It is funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.
 

 


 

">
 [PCST]
PCST Network

Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

QuarkNet bringing students to particle physics research

Andria Erzberger   Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Introduction:Quark Net pioneers the use of the Internet to partner teachers and students with the two largest experimental collaborations in the history of physics. Eventually 60 U.S. universities and labs involved in the new detectors at CERN and Fermilab will have high school physics teachers participating in research in the summer.  Then students will use live, on-line data to participate in actual research, while learning the fundamental concepts of physics.

University/Lab and High School Partnerships:In each of the five summers 24 teachers hold eight-week research appointments to work on research related to Fermilab and CERN experiments. Each team of teachers and their mentors establishes a center at their home university or research institution and leads a workshop for 10 teachers who join the group during the second summer.

Internet and the Classroom:To foster a local community among scientists, teachers, and students, communication is encouraged through workshops, Saturday meetings, e-mail, and personal contact.  The teachers are also part of a national community, which begins when they attend a one-week institute at Fermilab.  E-mail, listservs, and national meetings allow them to continue sharing ideas  with scientists and other teachers.  Students also communicate with scientists and other students through e-mail;  some will be selected to visit Fermilab and CERN and to report to other students by webcasts.
 
Teachers experience scientific research and then apply that understanding to their teaching.  They create data sets, experiments,and inquiry-based experiences that enable them to teach the basic concepts of introductory physics in a context that students find exciting.  What is new is the use of Internet for data sets and on-line experiments.  Examples of these will be shown.

Developers of Quark Net: Quark Net has been developed by a collaboration of teachers, educators and physicists.   It is funded by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.
 

 


 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

BACK TO TOP