This paper present the main results of an evaluation research conducted on the scientific exhibition "The Flood", organized in Trento (Italy) during this year. The myth of the Flood, his history and his  scientific  analysis  was  the  core  of  the  exhibition,  but  there  were  also  special  sections  about sustainable development and biotechnologies. A team of sociologists by the University of Trento and  Padova  set  up  a  research  project  with  the  aim  to  understand  what  kind  of  impact  this exhibition could have on the visitors, both on the level of improving their specific knowledge and on the level of their general attitudes in understanding scientific topics.

The research design was organised through a "three phase" survey - with a specific questionnaire filled by a sample of 200 visitors before attending the visit, just after and three months later- and through some in deep interviews.

The results show significant insights to understand what kind of contribution can these exhibitions make to public understanding of science.


 

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

What does it happen after an experimental attempt to evaluate the effects of a scientific exhibition on his visitors

Federico Neresini   University of Padova

This paper present the main results of an evaluation research conducted on the scientific exhibition "The Flood", organized in Trento (Italy) during this year. The myth of the Flood, his history and his  scientific  analysis  was  the  core  of  the  exhibition,  but  there  were  also  special  sections  about sustainable development and biotechnologies. A team of sociologists by the University of Trento and  Padova  set  up  a  research  project  with  the  aim  to  understand  what  kind  of  impact  this exhibition could have on the visitors, both on the level of improving their specific knowledge and on the level of their general attitudes in understanding scientific topics.

The research design was organised through a "three phase" survey - with a specific questionnaire filled by a sample of 200 visitors before attending the visit, just after and three months later- and through some in deep interviews.

The results show significant insights to understand what kind of contribution can these exhibitions make to public understanding of science.


 

A copy of the full paper has not yet been submitted.

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