How modern organisations seek and use knowledge is rapidly evolving. Information technologies, including databases, new telecommunications, and software for synthesizing information, make a vast array of information available to public and private organisational and their stakeholders.

As  organisations  continually  change  –  from  new  corporate  goals,  staff  turnover,  organisational  restructures, different strategic alliances and networks, and social pressures – the way that individuals seek information for their decision making needs has become a critical issue for scientists.

Mangers face a daunting task in today’s information environment. They must make intelligent judgements based on a  welter  of  facts,  opinions,  forecasts,  gossip  and  intuition.  On  the  one  hand  they  receive  too  much  information, while  on  the  other  hand,  they  don’t  get  enough  of  the  right  information.  The  central  problem  for  management  is condensing  a  wealth  of  information  from  social,  political,  economic  and  scientific  sources,  in  a  way  to  obtain  an accurate picture of an issue.

This  presentation  will  outline  how  scientists  can  better  understand  the  information  seeking  behaviour  of professionals.  It  will  show  how  traditional  methods  to  communicate  scientific  information  to  managers  in  large organisations often fail. Many information products, technologies and systems fail because they do not consider the needs of the users. Effective communication of information - to inspire action that positively changes public policy, industry  practices  or  community  behaviour  -  depends  on  well  established  organisational  partnerships,  extensive personal networks and the active involvement of managers in the information seeking process.





 

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Public Communication of Science and Technology

 

How managers seek and use information

Don Alcock  

How modern organisations seek and use knowledge is rapidly evolving. Information technologies, including databases, new telecommunications, and software for synthesizing information, make a vast array of information available to public and private organisational and their stakeholders.

As  organisations  continually  change  –  from  new  corporate  goals,  staff  turnover,  organisational  restructures, different strategic alliances and networks, and social pressures – the way that individuals seek information for their decision making needs has become a critical issue for scientists.

Mangers face a daunting task in today’s information environment. They must make intelligent judgements based on a  welter  of  facts,  opinions,  forecasts,  gossip  and  intuition.  On  the  one  hand  they  receive  too  much  information, while  on  the  other  hand,  they  don’t  get  enough  of  the  right  information.  The  central  problem  for  management  is condensing  a  wealth  of  information  from  social,  political,  economic  and  scientific  sources,  in  a  way  to  obtain  an accurate picture of an issue.

This  presentation  will  outline  how  scientists  can  better  understand  the  information  seeking  behaviour  of professionals.  It  will  show  how  traditional  methods  to  communicate  scientific  information  to  managers  in  large organisations often fail. Many information products, technologies and systems fail because they do not consider the needs of the users. Effective communication of information - to inspire action that positively changes public policy, industry  practices  or  community  behaviour  -  depends  on  well  established  organisational  partnerships,  extensive personal networks and the active involvement of managers in the information seeking process.





 

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