"The Simpsons", the world‐wide known TV program and longest‐running American sitcom, features more science than any other animated cartoon. Contemporary science issues as nuclear energy, environment, health, food, physics, space exploration, and evolution vs. creationism are among the most frequently addressed topics of this show. A show which, according to Stephen Hawking, is "the best thing on American television". And which features among its writers more scientists than any other TV show. Even "Nature" has devoted a long interview to Al Jean, one of the Simpsons' writers, to the presence of science in the show.

My talk will focus on how science communication and the communication of risk is represented and parodied in the cartoon. Analyzing short sequences from both the "documentary films" offered on a regular basis to the pupils of Springfield elementary school and Kent Brockman's "Channel Six" (Springfield's TV channel, featuring news and talk‐shows as "Rock Bottom"), I will show that "The Simpsons" is an excellent product to raise awareness about the most complex issues in science and society.

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There's plenty of rock at the bottom
Science journalism in the Simpsons

Marco Malaspina   INAF (Italian National Institute for Astrophysics)

"The Simpsons", the world‐wide known TV program and longest‐running American sitcom, features more science than any other animated cartoon. Contemporary science issues as nuclear energy, environment, health, food, physics, space exploration, and evolution vs. creationism are among the most frequently addressed topics of this show. A show which, according to Stephen Hawking, is "the best thing on American television". And which features among its writers more scientists than any other TV show. Even "Nature" has devoted a long interview to Al Jean, one of the Simpsons' writers, to the presence of science in the show.

My talk will focus on how science communication and the communication of risk is represented and parodied in the cartoon. Analyzing short sequences from both the "documentary films" offered on a regular basis to the pupils of Springfield elementary school and Kent Brockman's "Channel Six" (Springfield's TV channel, featuring news and talk‐shows as "Rock Bottom"), I will show that "The Simpsons" is an excellent product to raise awareness about the most complex issues in science and society.

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